Menu boczne

Treść strony

11

MICHAŁ POCZĄTEK, ZYGMUNT MACHOY, IZABELA GUTOWSKA, DARIUSZ CHLUBEK

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF OCCUPATIONAL RISK IN INDUSTRY
EMPLOYEES BASED ON CONCENTRATIONS OF SOME ELEMENTS IN TEETH
AND BODY FLUIDS

Summary
Work safety and hygiene is a set of basic measures to protect workers from the negative effects of manufacturing processes. So far, numerous procedures for assessment of occupational health risk have been described. We measured the concentrations of some elements in teeth and body fluids of employees working in three different industries with an established production profile: Zakłady Naprawcze Taboru Kolejowego (repairs of rail vehicles), Philips Lighting Poland (production of lighting systems) and Metalplast (build ing furbishing factory). Different technologies were in place at each of these plants. Basing on laboratory analyses, the risk of exposure to chemical substances was evaluated. The study material included 100 extracted teeth, as well as body fluid samples (saliva, urine and blood) collected during routine health checks. Whenever possible, concentrations of the following elements were measured: calcium, magnesium, fluorine, phosphorus in the form of phosphates, potassium, sodium, iron, zinc, copper, cadmium, and lead. Metal elements were measured spectrophotometrically (ASA), fluorine with an ion-selective electrode, and phosphates with a colorimetric method. We found that concentrations of the elements in teeth and body fluids differed depending on the industry. For teeth, statistically significant differences applied to magnesium, phosphates, zinc, sodium, and potassium. In body fluids, statistically significant differences were found for calcium (blood and urine), magnesium (blood, urine and saliva), zinc (blood, urine and saliva), iron, lead and copper (urine). In conclusion, our findings may be helpful for monitoring safety at work in industrial plants.

K e y w o r d s : industrial toxicology – monitoring – macroelements – microelements – teeth – body fluids.

Powrót
do góry